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NWR birds

When we first began birding at National Wildlife Refuges in 2013 we took hundreds of photos of birds to help us with identification. After 6 years of birding we definitely are more experienced birders and spend more time with our binoculars than our cameras.  These are some of our favorite photos of the birds we have been able to photograph at National Wildlife Refuges.

Birds at National Wildlife Refuges

Endangered species of birds found at National Wildlife Refuges

 

National Wildlife Refuges provide valuable habitat to endangered species of plants and animals. Endangered species are animals and plants that are in danger of becoming extinct. Here is a list of some of the endangered species of birds that nest, breed or winter at the National Wildlife Refuges we have visited.

Red-cockaded Woodpecker is a native bird of the southeastern forests, prefers mature, open canopy pine stands with a low ground cover of grasses and forbs for nesting. Red-cockaded Woodpeckers are the only woodpecker that excavates cavities exclusively in living pine trees, that are mature, generally over 80 years old. Big Branch National Wildlife Refuge in Louisiana, Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge in Georgia, Carolina Sandhill National Wildlife Refuge in South Carolina.

Interior Least Tern which number only 8,000 birds in the wild. The terns nest on barren or sparsely vegetated sandbars of lakes, rivers, reservoirs and shorelines. Gravel nesting islands have been created at Cane Ridge Wildlife Management Area.  Cane Ridge Wildlife Management Area is part of Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge. Habitat Loss or Degradation and Nest Disturbance. 
 

Whooping Crane All wild and captive Whooping Cranes alive today are descendants of the last 15 cranes found wintering at the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge in 1941. Whooping Cranes live up to 25 years in the wild. The only natural wild flock of whooping cranes nests in Wood Buffalo National Park in Canada and winter at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge in Texas.

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